Friday, 18 April 2014

Dit Da Jow - Sifu Waybe Belonoha's article in Wing Chun Illustrated Magazine Issued No.17

"It is not surprising to learn that the traditionally prepared Dit Da Jow contained a variety of bioactive compounds that are clearly beneficial for fist conditioning and impact trauma. The liniment is grounded in the long history of Traditional Chinese Medicine, which utilises the secret language of plants—chemistry (and science!). The carefully combined plants, fungi and insects that degraded and released their compounds into the alcohol over time produced a liniment rich with bioactive molecules. This time-dependent natural process also created differences between the aged liniments, with each containing a unique combination of bioactive compounds that can be useful for different applications."
-- Spread of Sifu Wayne Belonoha's article from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.

Wing Chun Illustrated Magazine Issued No.17- Moy Bah Hugh (Infinite Love And Gratitude)

"Many years ago I asked Sifu what his method was. Sifu wrote down on a napkin in Chinese two characters called Sum Fot, and in Cantonese it means 'Heart Method'. It was the way of the heart. Little did I understand then how much this would affect my way in life, especially when early on I was focused too much on the way of the fist. The transmission of knowledge is through a direct relationship, like father-and-son. So Sum Fot was the heart’s way and the correct way to care, to guide, and to love. This was the transmission. Ving Tsun is just a system. Just a tool that we use. How you use your tool is the Gung Fu. Gung Fu is the result. But where is it? You can’t see it. Whether it’s Karate, Ju-Jitsu or Ving Tsun, those systems are not Gung Fu. Some may say yes they are Gung Fu; and I always reply with, 'No, they are just methods!' Again the result is Gung Fu."
-- Spread of our interview with Sifu Moy Bah Hugh from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Wing Chun Illustrated Magazine Issued No.17- Gung Fu For Everyone

"Changes haven’t been made to our system intentionally; these changes have evolved naturally through the means of hard training and are therefore necessary. Through these lineages, we learnt how to effectively use the right energy at the right time and in the right space. The engine, what we use in our IMAA Wing Tjun, is totally different now. Everything is based on detachment, relaxation, and importantly, awareness. However, the most important is that we start to learn to control our emotions and our mind in a fight. This gives us the ability to fight in a more relaxed way during real fights. Some of our students have proven this successfully in MMA competitions."
-- Spread of our interview with Sifu Taner and Sifu Graziano from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18. 
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wing Chun Illustrated Magazine Issued No.17- Siuhing Baan Jung Wing Chun

"When the fight started Ji Sin was standing calmly and asked Wong Kwan to begin. Wong Kwan attacked with Seung Lung Cheut Hoi—punching Ji Sin’s chest with both of his fists. Ji Sin used his palm skills of Tin Wong Tok Taap and flung Wong away. Wong tried to use the force and jumped on the column. Although Wong still didn’t recognise Ji Sin, he suspected that the old man was his teacher because of this gimmick that he deployed. Wong then jumped onto the stage and humbly apologised to his master. The event stunned the King Fa Hall performers. After that, all of the performers asked Ji Sin to teach them Gung Fu."
-- Spread of Sifu Ivan Rzounek's article from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Friday, 11 April 2014

Wing Chun: A Lifelong Commitment to Developing Skill

"As a coach, you are primarily responsible for the physical training of your wards; this means you will need to keep on top of latest sports science. In any club, there is likely to be a wide range of different ages and varying levels of strength and fitness. The condition of individuals needs to be considered before planning any programme of exercise. To be able to maintain an effective training regime you need to remain relatively free from injury. Martial arts are repetitive by nature, so it is important to train in methods that are balanced and will not cause habitual, long-term damage."
-- Spread of Sifu Alan Gibson's article from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wing Chun Illustrated Magazine No.17- The Legacy of Ip Man

"Chi Sao is the training method that uniquely differentiates Wing Chun from other systems. Chi Sao allows us to develop the concepts and make our reactions automated and immediate. You have to control the structure of your opponent—keep applying constant forward pressure (Heung Ching), develop automatic reactions (Lat Sao Jik Chong) and train to attack when there is a slight opening. If you practise Chi Sao by only trying to hit each other in any way possible, then you will not achieve the desired benefits—in this case it would be better to do free sparring."
-- Spread of our interview with Sifu José Ortiz from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18. 
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Wing Chun Illustrated No.17 - Training the Mind to Train the Body

"Psychologists have identified several 'principles of learning'; the primary one being the 'principle of exercise' which states that those things most often repeated are best remembered—which is the basis of martial arts drill and practice. The reality of it is that the human memory is fallible, so we do not learn complex tasks immediately during a single session. By slowly, meticulously and repetitiously practising the stance and the arm movements of the forms, we improve our ability to retain, evaluate, and apply the new-found concepts or practices. This repetitious practice ensures learning continues, which includes student recall, review and summary, manual drill and physical applications."
-- Spread of Sifu Shaun Rawcliffe's article from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style...

The new Issue No. 17 featuring Sifu Gregory LeBlanc will go on sale April 18.
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Wing Chun Illustrated Issued No.17 - Wing Chun must Keep The Times, Sifu Kong Chi Keung

"There are two factors in Wing Chun that have true value: Training and Combat. Those who seek training are seeking to practise self-discipline; those who pursue combat seek practical application, and regardless, both are inseparable! Practice alone, without combat, cannot be called practical martial arts, it can only be called martial arts exercise. Both complement each other, and the experience absorbed during both training and practical combat will naturally help in the development of tactical refinement; only then will one appreciate the real Wing Chun."
-- Spread of Sifu Kong Chi Keung's article from the upcoming Issue No. 17. New issue on sale April 18.#WingChunIllustrated #WingChun#KongChiKeung
Wing Chun Illustrated (WCI) is the world’s only magazine dedicated to Wing Chun, regardless of lineage or style. Published six times a year, each 60-page, full-colour issue features articles by and about the world’s greatest exponents of the art. WCI is available in various formats: Print (ships worldwide), iOS, Kindle Fire, and Desktop. For more details, please refer to:

Friday, 4 April 2014

The Chi Sao of Wing Chun - BRUCE LEE

An article that Bruce Lee did on Chi Sao in 1969 for Black Belt magazine.

-with thanks to Chris Kent (Jeet Kune Do) 








Wing Chun/Ving Tsun Chi Sai Exercise

Chi Sao is an exercise for improving close distance focusing with the eyes and contact reflexes.

After a block, there exists a contact point. At this point, an opponent's intended move is transmitted as a vibration. The response to this vibration is a contact reflex action.

The Principle behind contact reflexes is similar to that of fishing. When a fishing line is in water, the fisherman doesn't have to see the bait taken to know there's a fish on the line. When a fish strikes the bait, there's vibration on the line and the fisherman feels the movement where he holds the rod-the contact point.

In Wing Chun training for developing contact reflexes, the practitioner attempts to interrupt an opponent's next movement from the vibration at the point
of contact and counter instantly.

The side benefits of Chi Sao exercise are improvements in mobility at close range, timing of movements, accuracy of strike, generation of power at short range, and control of an opponent's balance and arms from point of contact.

There are three stages of Chi Sao training:
a) single handed Chi Sao, parallel armed
b) single handed Chi Sao, cross armed
c) double handed Chi Sao

At each stage of training, one must progress from predetermined movements to random movements and then at the advanced stage, to training blind-folded.

It is important to understand the techniques used in Chi Sao may not apply to actual combat situations. However, the experience and the coordination achieved from these exercises are essential to combat.

Cross-Arm Chi Sao

Once the practitioner has achieved a certain degree of proficiency from the other Chi Sao exercises (including Larp Sao exercise), he will move on to cross
arm Chi Sao. As with all Chi Sao exercises, cross arm Chi Sao is a drill- the contact sensitivity garnered from these drills will be what carries over into 'the Street." However, of all the Chi Sao exercises, the cross arm drills take the practitioner closest to actual combat. This is because it trains the footwork necessary to bridge the gap between contact distance and exchange distance.

Contact distance is the range at which one can only achieve contact with the extremities of the opponent's limbs. At this distance, one may be able to block, but cannot reach the opponent with the counter attack. The objective from this distance is to get to the range where one can block and counter simultaneously, i.e.: exchange distance. Again, it is the footwork that will allow practitioner to successfully accomplish this objective.

The term 'cross arm' refers to the contact relationship the practitioner has with the opponent at the onset of the exercise. To Begin, the practitioner will start from a forward stance position, with the forward arm making contact with the opponent's forward arm at the wrist area. If the contact relationship is either right arm to right arm or left arm to left, the arms will form an "X" (i.e.: cross) at the point of intersection (if the arms meet right to left or left to right- in Wing Chun- this relationship is called 'parallel'; but that's another drill).

We will now examine the cross arm Chi Sao drills from two primary perspectives: first offensive, then defensive.

The drill commences the instant the two practitioners make contact in this cross arm position. Offensively, the objective is to sense any fluctuation in the opponent's energy. (Are they too tense? Are they pushing down, or to the side? Is there a lack of forward energy in their arm?) If an opening is sensed, then the practitioner should immediately execute an attack.

There are, however, two obstacles that may interfere with this objective. One is the opponent's lead arm and the second is the opponent's rear arm. Therefore, one must first eliminate the opponent's lead arm from the equation (by using a Pak Sao or Larp Sao, for example) and simultaneously step forward to the blind side (outside of the lead arm) and counter attack (arriving at exchange distance). This forces the opponent to block with the rear hand or get hit! 

The practitioner will identify the force applied in the opponent's (rear hand) block, redirect or release this force, then execute another attack. This process may continue until the practitioner achieves a clear advantage-trapping up the opponent's arms and disrupting his balance.

When the practitioner successfully forces the opponent to block with the rear hand, the opponent will usually have to reach across his body to defend. If this occurs, the opponent most likely will have crossed his own arms in the process. This is an ideal situation for the practitioner. If the opponent crosses his arms, one should immediately pin the arms at the centre of the "X" and if both arms are trapped, this leaves the opponent completely vulnerable to the practitioner's attack. 

A quick review: the contact reflexes are used to first sense an opening, then to determine the nature of the force in the opponent's defense. This energy is redirected or released and another attack is initiated. Whenever possible, force the opponent to cross his own arms and pin them-continuing the offensive.

On the defensive front, the first objective is quite simple: block! Because the opponent's objective is to shut down the lead arm first, the practitioner should ideally counter the attempted trap and strike with his lead arm. If the lead arm defense is successful, this will free up the practitioner's rear hand to immediately counter back, thereby putting the opponent on the defensive.

Even if the opponent manages to get past the lead arm and forces the practitioner to block with the rear hand, the practitioner's objective is still the same: put the opponent on the defensive by immediately counter attacking. Granted, the use of the rear hand to defend is not ideal in this situation, for it does put the opponent one step closer to achieving his objective. But it's not over until it's over. Even if the opponent reaches the rear hand, the possibility still exists to turn the situation around into the practitioner's favour. That's why the rear hand is so important in the Wing Chun system- it backs up the lead arm in case the primary defense fails.

Thus the contact reflexes are used defensively to feel the opponent's attack as it commences. What one feels combined with what one sees (visual reflexes) will determine the most appropriate defense. Again, the objective from a blocking situation is to put the opponent back on the defensive. This, of course, puts the practitioner on the offensive and the contact reflexes now apply as stated previously.

Perhaps because of its realistic street application, cross arm Chi Sao was Bruce Lee's favourite of the Chi Sao exercises. He practiced it religiously.

In fact, cross arm Chi Sao was so important to Bruce, he paid direct homage to this exercise in the film "Enter the Dragon," when he used it in the famous tournament to defeat Han's ruthless bodyguard.

The most valuable and, I believe, indispensable tool Bruce Lee had for understanding the roots of combat came from his grounding in the practice of sticking hands, Chi Sao, which develops the awareness that allowed him to flow into spontaneous expression.

Bruce could say that he was "no style, but all styles" because the reflexes he'd acquired from sticking hands allowed him to automatically match any attack with the appropriate counter. In this way, his technique was the result of his opponent's technique. "You don't know what I'm going to do," Bruce would say. Neither did Bruce-until it happened!

-GM William Cheung 

Photo; GM William Cheung and Sifu Andrew Cheung 

*GM William Cheung, Thank you for the permission given to us to share this article on Chi Sau with our friends. 

-from the book 'Complete Wing Chun System' ©

We wish you all a great day in Wing Chun!

GM Ip Ching said that for his father, GGM Ip Man, the world was not a place to be feared. He had absolute faith in the ability of Wing Chun to protect him, and that he was a man of action, he would do as what he sees was right, because in Wing Chun, there is no hesitation, only right action.